Handmade Baby or Infant Onesie Part 2

Just a quick post for the second handmade baby onesie I just finished.  This time I chose to use the sleeveless style from the same Mammacandoit pattern found HERE.

I decided to use the same main fabric instead of a woven for the snap area, and I like it much better.  It was a little more difficult to maneuver, but I prefer the way it looks.  It also caused a difficulty when putting the snaps on because it was thicker, but they came out more aligned and more neat than the first onesie.

I wish I had enough matching thread to use in the serger, but I wasn’t about to go buy more just for one project.  Considering it won’t show, the white was fine and more importantly, I didn’t have to change the threads!  

I thought I picked out the same knit material, but I soon realized this one was much thicker and stretchier.  It was a little bit more difficult to work with so I did get some pinching and bunching in some areas.

Loving making these and I hope more of my friends start having babies so I have an excuse to make more!  Next up, I’ll try out the long sleeve style when I pick up more fabric!

Handmade Baby or Infant Onesie

I know I always say it, but I really am so excited and pleased with my most recently finished craft project!  It’s something I’ve wanted to learn for awhile, but I’ve just always seemed to put off.

I absolutely love making baby items because they’re all so cute and tiny, and it’s an excuse to use all of the absolutely adorable fabric prints available!  I was a little disappointed this time though, that when I went shopping for fabric, the selection wasn’t as great as it has been in the past.

I found this cute little dump truck fabric that would work cute for a little baby boy’s onesie.  I believe it was an interlock, which is a nice stretchy knit that is a little thicker than jersey knit.


It’s been sooooo long since I’ve worked with a knit fabric.  I was actually a little intimidated getting started again because it really is different than working with wovens.  It was a perfect excuse to pull out the serger again so that I can get some practice in before the secret project I’m working on.


I don’t believe you always need special equipment to make things, but a serger seriously helps take your handmade items to the next level.  It’s amazing for creating beautifully finished seams like the manufacturers.  I’m such a perfectionist that it’s a MUST if I’m sewing apparel items.

If you’re planning on using a serger for your knits, don’t be intimidated by playing with your machine’s features.  More specifically, the differential feed.  The differential feed refers to how the fabric is fed through the machine.  Knits tend to curl or wave when passed through the machine at the standard machine setting.  For my machine, the standard is 1.0.  By increasing the differential feed to greater than 1.0, it tends to “gather” the fabric as it’s being serged, rather than stretching it.  You will have to check your machine’s manual, and I also recommend doing a test swatch to find the right setting.


Always do a test swatch on a scrap of the fabric you will use.  Below shows the importance of adjusting your serger’s differential feed:

Above: standard differential feed setting vs. increasing the differential feed

I found a pattern on Etsy for the baby onesie that included a wide range of sizes and different sleeve styles.

The link to the mommacandoit shop can be found HERE.

The instructions for the baby onesie were very easy to follow and it finishes up fairly quickly.  I used both my serger and my regular sewing machine, and I think it helps add a more professional finish.  The only thing I wasn’t fond of was using a woven in the crotch area where the snaps are adhered.  I would prefer just using the same knit fabric, or binding the edge like the the neck and legs.

Finish the seam edges with a serger, and use your machine to topstitch for a polished look


It was at this point that I realized I had placed the first set of snaps on wrong!! Luckily, it wasn’t too much of a pain to remove and correct them.

I was a little bummed that after correcting them, I put the second set on crooked.  It’s ok though, I’ll get it right on the next one!


Overall, I loved making this baby onesie!  It is so cute and tiny and can’t wait to give it to the sweet little baby boy.  I’m happy I took the time to learn how to make a onesie, because it will make another great gift to go along with my baby blankets!